The project entails building a modern terminal with new facilities such as a gatehouse with eight lines, doubling its capacity to receive and ship containers, as well as an office building, a new connection bank for refrigerated cargo and agricultural inspection platforms for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

FIT’s CEO, Klaus Stadthagen, commented, “These investments are part of our long-term development plan to continue positioning FIT as one of South Florida’s main cargo terminals, with the best customer service in the region.”

All of these infrastructure investments are accompanied by a plan to increase security for associates and cargo and other continual improvements in terminal operations.

Since opening, cargo movements through Florida International Terminal have grown significantly, reaching over 202 thousand TEUS in 2016. Its main customers are world-class shipping lines like Hamburg Süd, Hapag Lloyd, Sealand, Yang Ming, NYK, ZIM, CMA-CGM/APL.

The terminal is equipped with 15 container cranes (Taylor & Hyster brands), ten forklifts with varying lifting capacities and 26 pieces of equipment for moving containers to and from the dock. The port also uses a state-of-the-art operating system from Tideworks Technology.

Source: saam
2017-06-28

Naval gazing, what lies ahead for the supply chain Nashville TN

As this blighted year nears its end, three maritime journalists were asked to assess the industry as it enters a critical period in history. Change is afoot and 2021 is likely to herald a new beginning for some, writes Nick Savvides, managing editor at Container News.

Read more ...

Naval gazing, what lies ahead for the supply chain Rockford IL

As this blighted year nears its end, three maritime journalists were asked to assess the industry as it enters a critical period in history. Change is afoot and 2021 is likely to herald a new beginning for some, writes Nick Savvides, managing editor at Container News.

Read more ...