Year to date, full import volumes were up 7 percent to 694,175 TEUs (20-foot equivalent units). Meanwhile, full exports grew 2 percent to 476,745 TEUs. Total international container volume, including empties, increased 10 percent year to date to 1,477,870 TEUs.

Full imports for the month of June declined 10 percent to 115,788 TEUs compared to last year. Full exports were down 15 percent to 73,916 TEUs for the month. Empty exports grew 60 percent as ocean carriers continue to reposition containers to Asia in preparation for peak season. The National Retail Federation recently projected in its June – October forecast that imports are expected to continue their strong growth trend.

Total domestic volumes for the month declined 3 percent compared to the same month last year. Alaska’s year-to-date volumes are down 8 percent and are expected to end the year 5 to 6 percent lower due to soft market conditions. Hawaii volumes through the Pacific Northwest declined 3 percent due to diversion to Southern California.

Other cargo:

  • Driven by consistent demand from China, log volumes continue to grow. They were up 138 percent to 159,704 metric tons over the same time last year.
  • Breakbulk cargo was down 1 percent, to 93,257 metric tons year to date, due to soft market conditions.
  • Autos, at 74,489 units year to date, were down 17 percent compared to the same time last year, reflecting weakening U.S. demand and shifting manufacturing locations.

View the June 2017 cargo reports:

Source: nwseaportalliance
2017-07-27

Naval gazing, what lies ahead for the supply chain Nashville TN

As this blighted year nears its end, three maritime journalists were asked to assess the industry as it enters a critical period in history. Change is afoot and 2021 is likely to herald a new beginning for some, writes Nick Savvides, managing editor at Container News.

Read more ...

Naval gazing, what lies ahead for the supply chain Rockford IL

As this blighted year nears its end, three maritime journalists were asked to assess the industry as it enters a critical period in history. Change is afoot and 2021 is likely to herald a new beginning for some, writes Nick Savvides, managing editor at Container News.

Read more ...