After last year’s successful pilot program, the Managing Members again approved the program to help the marine terminal operators avoid congestion on surface streets in the port industrial area and keep import and export cargo flowing efficiently.

This pilot program will reimburse terminal operators for some of the costs to operate additional hours during off-shift gates. Off-shift gates are after 5 p.m. Monday through Friday or any shift on Saturday or Sunday.

During last year’s peak season, international container terminal operators added about 70 to 90 hours per week, which accounted for about 8 to 10 percent of the total NWSA gate volumes.

This pilot program is one more way the NWSA seeks to be the easiest gateway in which to do business. By using the extended gate hours, truck drivers can reduce the time spent in traffic, which helps reduce air emissions from idling and saves fuel.

The updated program will kick off the week of Aug. 12 and last through the peak season.

Truckers should confirm each terminal’s schedule on its website:

About The Northwest Seaport Alliance

The Northwest Seaport Alliance is a marine cargo operating partnership of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma. Combined, the ports are the fourth-largest container gateway in North America. Regional marine cargo facilities also are a major center for bulk, breakbulk, project/heavy-lift cargoes, automobiles and trucks.

Source: nwseaportalliance
2017-08-03

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