Seven months into 2017, Port container volumes are 9.5 percent ahead of 2016, when the Port of Los Angeles handled a record-breaking 8.8 million TEUs.

“As we strive to maintain our competitive edge with these record volumes, it’s important to acknowledge the Pacific Maritime Association and the good men and women of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union who just extended their contract with terminal operators until 2022,” said Gene Seroka, Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles.  “The certainty that comes from this decision builds further long-term confidence in our supply chain as we continue to focus on superior infrastructure, innovative leadership and extraordinary customer service.”

July loaded imports increased 13 percent to 417,090 TEUs. Loaded exports rose 17 percent to 154,925 TEUs. Along with a 20 percent spike in empty containers, overall July container volumes were 796,804 TEUs. Previously, the strongest July in Port history was 2006, when 761,326 TEUs moved through the port’s terminals.

Through July, total 2017 cargo volumes are 5,279,352 TEUs, an increase of 9.5 percent compared to the same period in 2016. Current and past data container counts for the Port of Los Angeles may be found here.

rovided statistic breakdowns include annual and monthly container counts (in TEUs1) dating back to 1995. Container counts for years 1980-1994 are provided in calendar year totals only. For more information, contact the Port’s Media Relations Division at (310) 732-0430.

The following table lists container counts (TEUs) for the previous month. Statistics for the recorded month are released on or around the 15th day of the following month.

For general port industry statistics, visit the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) website.

July

2017
2016
Change
Percent Change
Loaded Inbound2417,090.75368,696.8548,393.9013.13%
Loaded Outbound3154,925.75132,490.0022,435.7516.93%
Total Loaded572,016.50501,186.8570,829.6514.13%
Total Empty224,787.50186,704.9538,082.5520.40%
Total796,804.00687,891.80108,912.2015.83%
Calendar Year 20174
(to date)
5,279,352.504,821,467.70457,884.809.50%
Fiscal Year 20175796,804.00687,891.80108,912.2015.83%
1TEUs = Twenty-foot equivalent units, a standardized maritime industry measurement used when counting cargo containers of varying lengths.
2Inbound = Imported containers.
3Outbound = Exported containers.
4Calendar Year Total for 2017
5Fiscal Year = July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018.

Historical TEU Statistics (by calendar year; includes monthly data)

Click on the desired year to view a statistical breakdown. Monthly breakdowns prior to calendar year 1995 are unavailable.

2010s

2000s

1990s

1980s

20107.8 million TEUs20004.9 million TEUs19902.1 million TEUs1980633,000 TEUs
20117.9 million TEUs20015.2 million TEUs19912.0 million TEUs1981476,000 TEUs
20128.1 million TEUs20026.1 million TEUs19922.3 million TEUs1982606,000 TEUs
20137.9 million TEUs20037.1 million TEUs19932.3 million TEUs1983734,000 TEUs
20148.3 million TEUs20047.3 million TEUs19942.5 million TEUs1984908,000 TEUs
20158.2 million TEUs20057.5 million TEUs19952.5 million TEUs19851.1 million TEUs
20168.8 million TEUs20068.5 million TEUs19962.7 million TEUs19861.3 million TEUs
2017year in progress20078.4 million TEUs19972.9 million TEUs19871.6 million TEUs
20087.8 million TEUs19983.4 million TEUs19881.7 million TEUs
20096.7 million TEUs19993.8 million TEUs19892.1 million TEUs
Source: portoflosangeles
2017-08-14

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