This follows upon the signing of contracts between the Virginia Port Authority and Konecranes for the delivery of 86 Automated Stacking Cranes, which took place in November of 2016.

The four Cantilever Rail Mounted Gantry (CRMG) cranes will be delivered to Virginia International Gateway (VIG) terminal as part of its expansion. The first two cranes will be delivered in the spring of 2018. The last two will be delivered in early 2019. The parties involved have agreed not to disclose the value of the contract.

The new Konecranes CRMGs are part of the expansion of the VIG’s intermodal yard, served by Norfolk Southern and CSX through an operating agreement with the Commonwealth Railway.

The new CRMGs will load and unload trains and terminal trucks with containers in the VIG’s intermodal yard. They will be dedicated intermodal handling cranes covering four rail lines, with the truck slots being perpendicular to the rail lines.

Mr Jussi Sarpio, General Manager of RMG and ARMG cranes, said: “I am very happy that the Virginia Port Authority’s confidence in our container handling technology also extends to cover their intermodal operations.”

The USA is a strategically important country for Konecranes across many industries, including container handling. With its Americas headquarters in Springfield, Ohio, Konecranes has over 2,100 employees in the USA and branch offices in 44 states that carry out sales and service activities.

Source: Konecranes
2017-02-15

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