Dockers last week called off a planned three-day strike after the government said it would put its reforms on hold and open talks, but the decision to push ahead with a bigger strike came after the government signalled it would not change parts of the plan, El Pais said, citing the CETM union.

Reuters could not reach CETM for comment.

The proposals would allow companies operating in ports to hire staff that do not belong to unions, a move unpopular with union members but which would help bring Spain in line with European Union regulations.

The nine days of stoppages across dozens of Spanish ports would take place on alternate days, meaning disruptions could drag on for three weeks between March 6 and March 24, El Pais said.

Negotiations between the unions and the government were set to continue.

About two-thirds of Spain’s exports pass through the ports, which handle some 500 million tonnes of merchandise a year.

http://www.reuters.com/article/spain-ports-idUSL8N1G66RK?feedType=RSS&amp%3BfeedName=industrialsSector

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/spain-ports-idUSL8N1G66RK?feedType=RSS&amp%3BfeedName=industrialsSector
2017-02-24

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