March international container volumes performed strongly post-Lunar New Year. At 120,018 TEUs (20-foot equivalent units), full imports grew almost 26 percent compared to March 2016. At 99,603 TEUs, full exports were up more than 9 percent in March, making it the strongest month for exports this year. Total international TEU volumes, including empties, increased by almost 21 percent compared to March 2016.

International volumes recorded the highest first quarter since 2005, which was a record-breaking year. This year’s first-quarter full imports reached 351,607 TEUs, up more than 13 percent. Meanwhile, full exports grew 6 percent at 247,186 TEUs. Total international containers, including empties, increased more than 13 percent year to date.

Total domestic volumes for the month declined more than 8 percent compared to March 2016. Year to date, Alaska volumes declined almost 4 percent and are expected to decline 5 to 6 percent this year due to soft market conditions. Hawaii volumes, however, are expected to show modest growth for the year and have grown 2 percent year to date.

Other cargo:

  • Breakbulk cargo was down 16 percent to 38,114 metric tons year to date, due to soft market conditions.
  • March was the fifth-largest month for autos in the past 21 years. Autos reached 44,317 units year to date and were flat compared to the first quarter of last year.
  • Driven by stronger demand from China, log volumes were up 76.1 percent to 62,753 metric tons compared to March 2016.
Source: nwseaportalliance
2017-04-24

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